fawnbabe:

If he doesn’t care about your orgasm, he doesn’t care about you

I fight Rape Culture because
When I told my ex boyfriend about my rape
He ‘forgave’ me.

I fight Rape Culture because
I saw my baby sister age overnight
As she told me about her best friend getting molested.

I fight Rape Culture because
My closest friend was abused as a child
And he told nobody but me.
It took him 13 years to open up.

I fight Rape Culture because
My friends admit to letting their partners fuck them when they don’t want it
Then laugh it off as typical male behaviour.

I fight Rape Culture because
Saying that you’re raping someone is perfectly acceptable
If you’re playing a video game.

I fight Rape Culture because
Men tell me they are insulted when women walking in front of them start to walk faster.
As if their ego is more important than our safety.

I fight Rape Culture because
If I tell somebody their rape joke isn’t funny
I am told that I’m uptight.

I fight Rape Culture because
It won’t die out
Unless we kill it ourselves.


I Fight Rape Culture - lomticks-of-toast  (via bundleofstring)

(Source: lomticks-of-toast)


littlelimpstiff14u2:

The Hallucinogenically Brilliant Marbles of Mike Gong

Marble artist Mike Gong creates beautifully detailed designs inside of small, handmade glass marbles. He pays close attention to detail to get every single element just right within the round interior of glass, and each of his creative concepts tells a crazy little story.

Gong produces mesmerizing clouds of color, texture, and patterns that seem out of this world. No two pieces are alike and, as you turn each marble around, the various details and unusual elements change color and sparkle in the reflecting light.

In particular, his Acid Eaters collection features wacky little faces that have big smiles, swirling eyes, and tongues sticking out of their mouths. Inside of the thick glass, hallucinations come alive and the happy guys appear distorted as viewers spin the glass around in their hands.


escapekit:

Transarquitetônica

Brazilian artist Henrique Oliveira recently completed work on his largest installation to date at Museu de Arte Contemporânea da Universidade in São Paulo. Oliveira uses the repurposed wood pieces as a skin nailed to an organic framework that looks intentionally like a large root system. Because the space provided by the museum was so immense, the artist expanded the installation into a fully immersive environment where viewers are welcome to enter the artwork and explore the cavernous interior.